A Dash of Election Perspective

Others have said it so well. I’m reblogging the best of them.

adoptingjames

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I think most people are shocked from last night’s election results. I couldn’t stay awake long enough to see the results, but my wife was kind enough to wake me up at 3:00 AM and report them to me. She knows, as a compulsive worrier, I was stressed about the election, even though I didn’t vote for either candidate. I voted third party, something I never thought I’d do. But knowing one of the two would win, I did have my preference.

But like so many early November Wednesdays in our country’s history, we as a people are prone to gloat, to bemoan, to judge, and to fight and accuse.

I’m sorry to those who didn’t get your choice. But just remember, those who got what they wanted today were just as devastated for the last two elections as you are today.

But we’re all still here. The world didn’t end for…

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Ten Most Common Errors Made by Writers: #10

And here’s #10 in Larry’s David Letterman Top Ten format: Contractions & Homonymic Convergence. I like big words; don’t you?

Polishing Your Prose

From the Editor’s Eye
The 10 Most Common Errors Made by Writers
(And How to Fix Them)

The first of a ten-part series.

#10. They’re, Their Now: Contractions & Homonymic Convergence

Our ears (and eyes) play dirty tricks on us when it comes to contractions and the words that sound like them. The process can cause us great anxiety as we think back to our eighth-grade English class and try to recall the rules Ms. Bitterlip laid out for us.

I encounter these examples most often:

  • They’re, Their, There, There’re
    • they’re = a contraction of they are:
      They’re going to the concert.
    • their = a pronoun relating to two or more people, especially in the sense of possession, ownership, or belonging to them:
      That is their house.
    • there = a place: He is standing over there.
      or a point in a process: There is where I disagree with…

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Sell Your Books To Non-Bookstores?

Getting your books into non-bookstores–an unconventional sales and marketing scheme. Keep thinking outside the box when marketing your books.

KRISTINA STANLEY

Dollar Store D$AFollowing my own advice, I’ve restocked two stores in the small town near me with DESCENT and BLAZE.

This happened in two ways.

As per the advice I give in the guide, I went by one of the stores and noticed they were down to 2 copies of Descent and none of Blaze. I called and asked if I could bring more. The store bought 6 or each and agreed to buy 10 of AVALANCHE as soon as I receive the print editions.

The other store send me a message asking for more books. I didn’t even have to go there to check on the stock.

We are heading into summer, hence tourist season and that’s when the books tend to sell well in our town. The timing couldn’t have been better.BLAZE and DESCENT LAmbert

My books are now selling in Lambert’s Pharmacy, The Dollar and General Store, and Sobeys. They get…

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Making it Big as an Author

I’ve been following Queen of Blank since last year’s NaNoWriMo. While we are at least a generation apart in age, I feel we are sharing the same larger soul. Maybe you’ll feel the same.

The Caffeinated Writer

FROM TROY & LAURICE.jpg

At work today, my coworker made a jab about my lack of progress on any of my writing lately. Part of me needs to be jabbed on occasion.

Not with anything sharp or pointy though. Not the literal jabbing. Please.

We got to talking about how hard it was to really “make it big” as an author these days. The market is saturated with books, and unless you can land publication with a huge publishing house, the odds are definitely stacked against you.

(For the record, I am NOT bashing self-publishing by any means. So please don’t take it that way.) 

It is definitely possible to make it big in self-publishing. It’s just really, really hard. You have to do everything for yourself.

But for many, it’s our only option when it becomes obvious that the big publishing houses aren’t willing to take many chances on new authors.

The chances…

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