Eight-Week Challenge: Preparation 3

The magazine backlog

My third 2017 eight-week challenge goal is

  • Spend one day a week reading the backlog of magazines sitting on the end table.

My real goal is to eliminate the backlog so that means reading at least 4 magazines a week, even if it takes more than one day of reading.

In preparation for the challenge, I piled all the unread magazines into groups by title and identified those which no longer have value because the events in them are in the past. This culling step did not eliminate magazines simply because the issue date is in the past. The majority of the magazines I receive contain information of enduring value. I also discovered more unread magazines than the 45 I knew were in the pile. After recycling those I knew I would not read, I was able to reduce the number 59 to 35. Remaining in my magazine stack:

  • 5 AARP magazines or bulletins. These publications contain tips for seniors, especially regarding trends where fraudsters target seniors. Getting through these 5 publications shouldn’t take more than a week.
  • 7 Foreign Service Journal. Reading this monthly publication from the American Foreign Service Association sometimes seems like work. So I put it off. Repeatedly. When I finally get around to these, I skim most of the articles, taking very little time. But then guilt sets in. In spite of my retired status, I feel I should take more of an interest in international relations. Especially since our president seems not to care. I should be immersing myself in the finer points of our country’s relationships with other nations. No matter what, I will attempt to read one issue from this group each week of the challenge.
  • 1 Romance Writers Report. A friend shared this magazine with me to help me understand the requirements of romance novels. I don’t think this is a genre I will likely tackle, though romance fiction is among the most frequently purchased, at least in the United States.
  • 2 Toastmasters magazines. The monthly publication of Toastmasters International contains news of the international organization with informative articles on leadership and communication. Since Toastmasters will be introducing a revised educational program over the course of the next year, I need to read these magazines, even if they are months old, in order to understand the transition from the current system to the new Pathways system. The magazines are no more than 30 pages. Reading articles of interest will take no longer than one evening. The few remaining in my stack of the unread is an indication that I usually read them as soon as they arrive.
  • 7 The Sun. One of my favorite magazines. It has no ads. Every page is full of intellectually stimulating content. Essays. Poetry. Photography. Short stories. And the monthly “Readers Write” column. I want to read every word in them, and that’s why they get set aside. I know it will take me a full day to get through the entire issue. Once I finish them, I pass them on to members of my read-and-critique group. It’s my goal to read at least one of these magazines each week.
  • 4 Viking magazines. The monthly magazine of Sons of Norway contains useful travel information as well as historical, cultural, and educational articles about Norway. I hope to travel to Norway in 2018. Reading these remainders will take no more than an evening or two.
  • 1 Westways magazine. The June issue remains. Any other issues of this magazine went out during the culling since the contents are time-sensitive.
  • 7 Writer’s Digest. Another publication jam-packed with important information relevant to my journey as a writer.
  • 1 Writers’ Journal. The same friend who shared Romance Writers Report shared this magazine with me. I haven’t even opened it yet.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Eight-Week Challenge: Preparation 2

Get More Exercise

My second 2017 eight-week challenge goal is

  • Walk at least 5,000 steps per day.

Yeah. That’s only half the distance I should be walking each day. But it’s a lot more than I’ve been walking recently. You know, in winter it was just too cold to go outside to walk. Driving to a mall might tempt me to buy something I don’t need or even want. And when the weather got better, I really just wanted a few more minutes to lie in each morning. What’s the point of retirement if I still have to get up early to do something I’d really rather not do?

That has got to change. So I will resume keeping track of the number of steps I walk each day. I’ll give myself a nice pat on the back when I reach at least 5,000 steps in a day, but I hope to step it up for something extra whenever I reach 10,000 steps. Hmmm. I wonder what the right incentive would be. I don’t suppose I should reward myself with ice cream.

 

Eight-Week Challenge: Preparation 1

Make Better Food Choices

My first 2017 eight-week challenge goal is

  • eat more nutritious food with fewer empty calories.

I was doing so well last year. I had adopted Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s recommendations in his book, Eat to Live, and was benefiting from not only the promised weight loss (with the more important reduction in the size of clothes I could wear) but also controlled my blood sugar level for six months without taking any medication. I also stopped taking a statin for cholesterol because I reduced the animal protein in my diet.

But then something got in the way. (Ok, I know, this is the beginning of the excuses.)

First, my husband wasn’t keen to join me on my nutritarian diet (Dr. Fuhrman’s term), so I was cooking two meals each evening, or more likely stir frying veggies for myself and then adding strips of meat to the same veggies for him. That option falls far short of the meat and three veg he prefers. For him, the veggies need to be cooked separately.

Then, no matter how much he praised the soups I cooked in large quantities to stock up the freezer, he started asking for something else instead.

So we tried going out for evening meals more often so I could stick with salads (dressing on the side, please) and he could have whatever he wanted. But something else on the menu seemed to catch my eye.

Eventually, the evening snack routine returned. I started out grabbing carrots and celery sticks. Then I added the hummus as a dip. After that, I started asking myself what’s it going to hurt if I just have some pita chips with that hummus.

One slipped step backward led to another, and now I’m right back to the weight I was before I started on Dr. Fuhrman’s journey. The good news: the clothes still fit, so something went right.

I’ll measure my progress the way I did last year, by calculating my Body Mass Index. I’ll be happy to keep my BMI at 25 or less.

Eight Week Challenge

In May of last year, one of my favorite bloggers, Queen of Blank (real name, Danielle), undertook an eight-week challenge in advance of her marriage to her sweetheart Brad and her move to Texas. She and Brad are now married, she now lives in Texas, and I know she took part in last year’s NaNoWriMo, though I haven’t seen as many posts from her this year.

Last year, to prepare for her move, Danielle set herself an eight-week challenge. And she inspired me to set up my own eight-week challenge. My goals last year were simple enough:

  • eat more nutritious food with fewer empty calories,
  • walk at least 5,000 steps per day,
  • spend one day a week reading the backlog of magazines sitting on the end table, and
  • write at least 500 words per day for at least five days each week.

I succeeded in my goals last year, but wouldn’t you know it? I’m almost back where I started from. I’ve slipped up on my nutritious food goal by letting a lot of calorie-laden foods back onto my plate, and my weight and waistline show it. I have a long list of excuses for why I can’t get out the door for a brisk walk each day. The backlog of magazines I had to read last year peaked at 38. As of today, I have 45 magazines in my stack of “to read.” And I’ve been concentrating on reading books for my Goodreads challenge instead of writing much.

Bottom line: All four of my goals for last year are relevant again this year. I’m thinking it’s like spring cleaning: I need to take the time to do these things, and I know I’ll feel great once they are done. But I’ll probably have to repeat the exercise again next year.

This year, I’m not waiting for someone else to set up a challenge to follow. I’m setting my own. I don’t have a specific event to mark the end of the eight weeks. But eight weeks seems like a good length of time. And the weather outside is glorious during summer.

Because we have a trip planned at the end of May that will complicate taking the right steps, I’ve set June 4 as my start date, a week later than last year’s challenge. The eight weeks will take me almost to the end of July.

I invite anyone who wishes to challenge themselves with a little mid-year adjustment of habits to join me. Include a link back to this post so I’ll know you’re joining in the challenge. Let me know what your goals are and I’ll check in on you each week to see how you’re doing. Maybe Danielle will join us, too.

I’m ready to dive in. I hope the water’s not too cold.

Skunked Words and Other Oddities

I recently came across the phrase skunked words or skunked terms to describe words for which the usage is in flux, evolving from the original meaning to one that may differ so much from the original that its meaning in context is ambiguous. Thanks Josh Bernoff of Without Bullshit.

The word Bernoff referred to when he introduced the term was fulsome. The original meaning for fulsome was copious or abundant. Over time, however, the word has been used more often to convey excessive or ingratiating flattery. Quite a different matter.

Bernoff cited three recent examples of politicians using fulsome, presumably with its original meaning. Because of the shift in meaning, however, the statements, when read with the negative connotations the term more recently conveys, may seem either humorous or sarcastic. Take a look at Bernoff’s examples below:

First, Sally Yates, former Deputy District Attorney, in her opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee on May 8, said

I also want to note that I intend my answers today to be as fulsome and comprehensive as possible while respecting my legal and ethical boundaries. As the Subcommittee understands, many of the topics of interest today concern classified information that I cannot address in this public setting, either directly or indirectly.

Then Republican Senator Corker commented on President Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey this way:

It is essential that ongoing investigations are fulsome and free of political interference until their completion.

Finally, Secretary Tillerson had described a call regarding Syria between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin this way:

It was a very constructive call that the two presidents had. It was a very, very fulsome call, a lot of detailed exchanges. So we’ll see where we go from here.

The phrase, skunked terms, appeared first in the Dictionary of Modern American Usage which included these examples: data, decimate, effete, enormity, fulsome, and transpire.

Those examples got me thinking about other problematic words. A few months ago I pointed out my dilemma about whether to use gantlet or gauntlet when referring to a figurative double line through which someone must pass with difficulty. I chose gantlet, the word with the original meaning of a form of punishment involving people armed with sticks forming two lines through which a person being punished must run in a piece I submitted to an anthology, OASIS Journal 2016. In contrast, the original meaning of gauntlet is an armored glove.

I’ve had my copy of the anthology around for several months, but hadn’t looked at my submission in it until this evening. I guess I’m not surprised that the editor changed my choice, gantlet, to the now acceptable alternate, gauntlet. But I wonder if she knew that my word choice is historically correct. Or am I really a linguistically pedantic snob?

I hereby propose both gantlet and gauntlet be added to the list of skunked terms.

Mother’s Day

The approach of Mother’s Day started me thinking about the books my mom gave me to read over the years.

Of course, she gave me lots of books when I was a child, but she gave me those so that she could read them to me.  The first one I recall she gave me to read for myself was Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. I figured if she gave it to me, it must have something in it I needed to read. I would never have dared ask her why. That’s just the way conversations in our house went. Mom and Dad told us what we should do. And we kids didn’t ask questions.

The family was on one of our annual vacations, staying at a lake in a cabin Dad rented for the week. It may even have been the year my twin brothers were born which would have made them less than three months old at the time, still demanding most of Mom’s time. Mom’s parents also spent the week with us that summer, too, squeezing four adults and six children into a rustic cabin with only two bedrooms. My brother and I slept in the car many nights that week.

So with twin infants and four older children around and responsibility for cooking meals for ten, Mom may have handed me the book simply to give me something to do to keep me out of her hair. But at the time I thought she must have had a specific reason.

I ran into a few words in that book that I didn’t understand. Chiffarobe was one. But I could figure out it was a heavy piece of furniture. It didn’t matter if it belonged in a living room, dining room, or bedroom. Knowing it was a heavy piece was all I needed.

But then there was that word rape. I didn’t know what that was except that it was something bad or else Tom Robinson wouldn’t have to go to trial with Atticus Finch to represent him. I decided I needed to know more, so as rare as it was for me to ask Mom anything, I dared to ask what the word meant. Because I hadn’t finished the book during the week of vacation, we were home by the time I asked, and she sent me to the dictionary to look it up.

I don’t recall just what dictionary we had in those days. But I remember what the definition said, or something very like it:

rape

transitive verb

  1. forcible carnal knowledge

That didn’t help. I had no idea what carnal meant either.  I already figured out there wasn’t much point in asking Mom another question since I already had the dictionary out. So I looked up that word, too.

carnal

adjective

  1. of the flesh

To be truthful, there may have been some other options for both words, but if so, they didn’t help. Nor do I remember them.

Bottom line: I spent plenty of years after reading that book having to be satisfied with knowing rape is something bad and chiffarobes are heavy.

Years later, as I was about to turn 50 years old, Mom sent me a book (I lived in Abu Dhabi at the time), Erica Jong’s Fear of Fifty. At least I understood why she chose that one for me.

What books do you recall your mother giving you to read?

What books would you love to be able to give to your mother today? In honor of Mother’s Day

A Dash of Election Perspective

Others have said it so well. I’m reblogging the best of them.

adoptingjames

azz2lknje6qwru8aifd7drtpkhmw2kgq-large

I think most people are shocked from last night’s election results. I couldn’t stay awake long enough to see the results, but my wife was kind enough to wake me up at 3:00 AM and report them to me. She knows, as a compulsive worrier, I was stressed about the election, even though I didn’t vote for either candidate. I voted third party, something I never thought I’d do. But knowing one of the two would win, I did have my preference.

But like so many early November Wednesdays in our country’s history, we as a people are prone to gloat, to bemoan, to judge, and to fight and accuse.

I’m sorry to those who didn’t get your choice. But just remember, those who got what they wanted today were just as devastated for the last two elections as you are today.

But we’re all still here. The world didn’t end for…

View original post 286 more words